Dedoose Publications
PUBLICATIONS

Dedoose has been field-tested and journal-proven by leading academic institutions and market researchers worldwide. Thousands of prominent researchers across the US and abroad have benefited from early versions of Dedoose in their qualitative and mixed methods work and have laid an outstanding publication and report trail along the way.

Education Based Publications

Mixing Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: Insights into Design and Analysis Issues

Lieber, Eli (2009)

Journal of Ethnographic and Qualitative Research, 3: 218-227

Discusses issues of design, sampling, and analysis in mixed methods research. Offers a model for conceptualizing a fully integrated design. Proposes and illustrates strategies for managing and dynamically integrating the qual and quant data to allow for efficient and multi-directional analysis. It is increasingly desirable to use multiple methods in research, but questions arise as to how best to design and analyze the data generated by mixed methods projects.
Geography Based Publications

Interviews and Questionnaires as Mixed Methods in Population Geography: TheCase of Lone Fathers in Newcastle, Australia

Winchester, Hilary P.M (1999)

A mixed method approach was adopted to study the experiences of lonefathers, using a classic triangulation approach of interview and questionnaire data. This study utilised an empirical realist framework of scientific enquiry, with the ‘soft’ individual interview data seen as an adjunct to the ‘hard’ aggregate quantitative methods. A review of this study found that the interviews worked well as a pilot study in a classic mixed methods framework. The questionnaires provided a range of information about thecharacteristics of this group of lone fathers, but it was the interviews which provided astonishing depth on the causes of marital breakdown and post-marital conflict, and on the discourses and other structures which sustain social processes. In this study, the interview techniques could have been used differently, in a different framework of analysis (that of critical rather than empirical realism) without the support of other mixed methods.
Education Based Publications

Developing Data Analysis

Silverman, David (2005)

Doing Qualitative Research, 2nd Edition (pp. 171-187)

Provides a step-by-step guide to all the questions students ask when beginning their first research project. Silverman demonstrates how to learn the craft of qualitative research by applying knowledge about different methods to actual data. He provides practical advice on key issues such as defining ‘originality’ and narrowing down a topic, keeping a research diary and writing a research report, and presenting research to different audiences.
Policy Based Publications

Higher Ground: New Hope for the Working Poor and Their Children

Duncan, Greg, Huston, Aletha, & Weisner, Thomas (2007)

New York: Russell Sage Foundation

During the 1990s, growing demands to end chronic welfare dependency culminated in the 1996 federal “welfare-to-work” reforms. But regardless of welfare reform, the United States has always been home to a large population of working poor—people who remain poor even when they work and do not receive welfare. In a concentrated effort to address the problems of the working poor, a coalition of community activists and business leaders in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, launched New Hope, an experimental program that boosted employment among the city’s poor while reducing poverty and improving children’s lives. In Higher Ground, Greg Duncan, Aletha Huston, and Thomas Weisner provide a compelling look at how New Hope can serve as a model for national anti-poverty policies via their qualitative, quantitative, and mixed method research approaches. New Hope was a social contract—not a welfare program—in which participants were required to work a minimum of thirty hours a week in order to be eligible for earnings supplements and health and child care subsidies. All participants had access to career counseling and temporary community service jobs. Drawing on evidence from surveys, public records of employment and earnings, in-depth interviews, and ethnographic observation, Higher Ground tells the story of this ambitious three-year social experiment and evaluates how participants fared relative to a control group. The results were highly encouraging. Poverty rates declined among families that participated in the program. Employment and earnings increased among participants who were not initially working full-time, relative to their counterparts in a control group. For those who had faced just one significant barrier to employment (such as a lack of access to child care or a spotty employment history), these gains lasted years after the program ended. Increased income, combined with New Hope’s subsidies for child care and health care, brought marked improvements to the well-being and development of participants’ children. Enrollment in child care centers increased, and fewer medical needs went unmet. Children performed better in school and exhibited fewer behavioral problems, and gains were particularly dramatic for boys, who are at the greatest risk for poor academic performance and behavioral disorders. As America takes stock of the successes and shortcomings of the Clinton-era welfare reforms, the authors convincingly demonstrate why New Hope could be a model for state and national policies to assist the working poor. Evidence based and insightfully written, Higher Ground illuminates how policymakers can make work pay for families struggling to escape poverty.
Education Based Publications

Finding Dignity in Dirty Work

Clare, Stacey (2005)

Sociology of Health and Illness

The aging of the population in the U.S. and elsewhere raises important questions about who will provide long-term care for the elderly and disabled. Current projections indicate that home care workers—most of whom are unskilled, untrained and underpaid—will increasingly absorb responsibility for care. While research to-date confirms the demanding aspects of the work and the need for improved working conditions, little is known about how home care workers themselves experience and negotiate their labour on a daily basis. This paper attempts to address this gap by examining how home care workers assign meaning to their “dirty work.” Qualitative interviews suggest that home care workers have conflicted, often contradictory, relationship to their labour. Workers identify constraints that compromise their ability to do a good job or to experience their work as meaningful, but they also report several rewards that come from caring for dependent adults. I suggest workers draw dignity from these rewards, especially workers who enter home care after fleeing an alienating service job, within or outside of the healthcare industry.
Education Based Publications

Lessons Learned for Teaching Mixed Research: A Framework for Novice Researchers

Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J. & Leech, Nancy L. (2009)

International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 3(1), 105-107

A concise description of key steps in the mixed research process. The authors further map this process onto issues/controversies in the use of mixed methods research and the challenges mixed methods researchers face.
Education Based Publications

HIV/STD Stigmatization Fears as Health-Seeking Barriers in China

Lieber, E. et all. (2006)

Internationally, stigma prohibits effective HIV/STD identification, prevention, and care. Interviews with 106 persons in an urban center in Eastern China, some known to have engaged in stigmatized risk acts (sex workers, STD clinic patients) and some vulnerable forstigmatization fears to influence health-seeking behaviors (market employees, rural-to-urban migrants). Interviews focused on community norms, values, beliefs, and emotional and behavioral reactions to HIV/STD stigmatization related events. Attributions for infection were found to mark individual’s failure to adhere to sexuality norms; define a condition warrantingthe avoidance of infected persons and dismissal by medical professionals; and promote anticipation of negative emotions (i.e., shame, fear, and embarrassment) and devalued social roles and status.
Geography Based Publications

Testing Cognitive Ethnography: Mixed-Methods in Developing Indicators of Well-Being in Fishing Communities

Benjamin Blount, Steven Jacob, Priscilla Weeks, and Michael Jepson (2015)

Research was initiated in 2008 with the objective of developing social indicators for well-being of fishing communities. Initial steps included development and testing indicators for the concepts of dependence, gentrification, vulnerability, and resiliency in relation to nine fishing communities on the Texas Gulf Coast. Procedurally, a mixed methods design was employed, using quantitative analyses of large secondary data sets to rank coastal communities based on socioeconomic measures, and independently employing qualitative approaches to provide rankings of the nine communities. The two qualitative approaches, an informed expert description of the communities, and cognitive-based interviews in the same communities each produced rankings almost identical with each other and with the quantitative rankings. Three types of analyses yielded similar results, indicating that cognitive ethnography can be a valuable tool in the description of community resilience, vulnerability, and well-being.
Education Based Publications

Toward a Unified Validation Framework in Mixed Methods Research

Dellinger, Amy B. & Leech, Nancy L. (2007)

Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 1(4), 309-332

Offers a validation framework to guide thinking about validation in mixed methods work. An orientation from both qualitative and quantitative perspectives is used to set the foundation for discussing and thinking about validation issues. To justify the use of this framework, the authors discuss traditional terminology and vailidity criteria for quantitative and qualitative research, as well as present recently recently published validity terminology for mixed methods research.
Sociology Based Publications

Qualitative Data Analysis

Seidel, John V. (1998)

Qualis Research

This is an essay on the basic processes in qualitative and mixed methods data analysis (QDA). It serves two purposes. It is a simple introduction for the newcomer of QDA. QDA is a process of noticing, collecting and thinking about interesting things. The purpose of this model is to show that there is asimple foundation to the complex and rigorous practice of QDA. Once you grasp this foundation you can move in many different directions. The idea for this model came from a conversation with one of my former teachers, Professor Ray Cuzzort. Ray was teaching an undergraduate statistics course and wanted to boil down the complexity of statistics to a simple model. His solution was to tell the students that statistics was a symphony based on two notes: means and standard deviations. I liked the simplicity and elegance of his formulation and decided to try and come up with a similar idea for describing QDA. The result was the idea that QDA is a symphony based on three notes: Noticing, Collecting, and Thinkingabout interesting things. While there is great diversity in the practice of QDA I would argue that all forms of QDA are based on these three “notes.” The QDA process is not linear. When you do QDA you do not simply Notice, Collect, and then Think about things, and then write a report. Rather, the process has the following characteristics: -Iterative and Progressive: The process is iterative and progressive because it is a cycle that keeps repeating. For example, when you are thinking about things you also start noticing new things in the data. You then collect and think about these new things. In principle the process is an infinite spiral. -Recursive: The process is recursive because one part can call you back to a previous part. For example, while you are busy collecting things you might simultaneously start noticing new things to collect. -Holographic: The process is holographic in that each step in the process contains the entire process. For example, when you first notice things you are already mentally collecting and thinking about those things. Thus, while there is a simple foundation to QDA, the process of doing qualitative data analysis is complex. The key is to root yourself in this foundation and the rest will flow from this foundation.
11-20 of 100