Dedoose Publications
PUBLICATIONS

Dedoose has been field-tested and journal-proven by leading academic institutions and market researchers worldwide. Thousands of prominent researchers across the US and abroad have benefited from early versions of Dedoose in their qualitative and mixed methods work and have laid an outstanding publication and report trail along the way.

Education Based Publications

Making Sense of Qualitative Data

Coffey, Paul A., & Atkinson, Amanda J. (1996)

Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications

Describes and illustrates a number of key, complementary approaches to qualitative data and offers practical advice on the many ways to analyze data. Practical and straightforward, with special attention paid to the possibilities in computer-aided analysis. A resource to students and professionals in qualitative and research methods, sociology, anthropology, communication, management, and education for inter-rater reliability and its use in coding validity.
Policy Based Publications

Impacts of Children with Troubles on Working Poor Families: Experimental and Mixed Methods Evidence

Bernheimer, L., Weisner, T.S., & Lowe, E. (2003)

Mental Retardation, 41(6): 403-419

Mixed-method and experimental data on working poor families and children with troubles participating in the New Hope anti-poverty experimental initiative in Milwaukee are described. Sixty percent of these families had at least one child who had significant problems (learning, school achievement and/or behavior, home behavior, retardation, other disabilities). Control group familieswith children who had troubles had more difficulties in sustaining their family routine than did New Hope experimental families.
Geography Based Publications

Using GPS and geo-narratives: a methodological approach for understanding and situating everyday green space encounters

Sarah L Bell, Cassandra Phoenix, Rebecca Lovell, Benedict W Wheeler (2015)

This methods paper contributes to the recent proliferation of methodological innovation aimed at nurturing research encounters and exchanges that facilitate in-depth insights into people's everyday practices and routine place encounters. By drawing on the experiences of an interpretive study seeking to situate people's green space wellbeing practices within their daily lives, we suggest value in using personalised maps – produced using participant accelerometer (physical activity) and Global Positioning System (GPS) data – alongside in-depth and mobile ‘go-along’ qualitative interview approaches. After introducing the study and the methods adopted, the paper discusses three opportunities offered by this mixed method approach to contribute a more nuanced, contextualised understanding of participants' green space experiences. These include: (a) the benefits of engaging participants in the interpretation of their own practices; (b) the value of using maps to provide a visual aid to discussion about the importance of participants' routine, often pre-reflective practices; and (c) the production of a layered appreciation of participants' local green and blue space wellbeing experiences. Used in combination, such methods have the potential to provide a more comprehensive picture of how current green space experiences, be they infrequent and meaningful, or more routine and habitual, are shaped by everyday individual agency, life circumstances and past place experiences.
Education Based Publications

Distinguishing the Trees from the Forest: Applying Cluster Analysis to Thematic Qualitative Data

Guest, Greg & McLellan, Eleanor (2003)

Field Methods, 15(2): 186-201

Qualitative data analysis requires organizing and synthesizing often large quantities of text. In many cases, this analysis entails negotiating the interplay between raw data, semantic themes or codes, and the overarching conceptual framework. In this article, the authors use a case study, which examines HIV vaccine efficacy trial participants' discourse, to demonstrate how cluster analysis can be used to aid in the analysis of large qualitative data sets. After briefly reviewing the systematic approaches to qualitative analysis and describing the project background, the authors present an example of how a hierarchical cluster technique can be incorporated into a multistage thematic analysis. Cited by Macia In this article I discuss cluster analysis as an exploratory tool to support the identification of associations within qualitative data. While not appropriate for all qualitative projects, cluster analysis can be particularly helpful in identifying patterns where numerous cases are studied. I use as illustration a research project on Latino grievances to offer a detailed explanation of the main steps in cluster analysis, providing specific considerations for its use with qualitative data. I specifically describe the issues of data transformation, the choice of clustering methods and similarity measures, the identification of a cluster solution, and the interpretation of the data in a qualitative context. Keywords: Cluster Analysis, Qualitative Analysis, Data Exploration, Mixed
Geography Based Publications

Key Methods in Geography

Clifford, Nicholas; Cope, Meghan; Gillespie, Thomas; French, Shaun (2016)

"Practical, accessible, careful and interesting, this...revised volume brings the subject up-to-date and explains, in bite sized chunks, the "how's" and "why's" of modern day geographical study...[It] brings together physical and human approaches again in a new synthesis." - Danny Dorling, Professor of Geography, University of Oxford Key Methods in Geography is the perfect introductory companion, providing an overview of qualitative and quantitative methods for human and physical geography.
Education Based Publications

Toward a Definition of Mixed Methods Research

Johnson, R. Burke, Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J., & Turner, Lisa A. (2007)

Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 1(2), 112-133

Examines the definition of the emerging mixed methods research field. Surveyed major authors in the mixed method literature with regard to definition for the field and key issues that need to be addressed as the field advances. Results show a consensus of mixed methods as an emerging ‘research paradigm’ and a breadth of opinion around definition for the field.
Education Based Publications

Prepared Patients: Internet Information Seeking by New Rheumatology Patients

Hay, Lieber Et Al (2008)

American College of Rheumatology

Objective: To investigate to what extent and why new rheumatology patients access medical information online prior to first appointments and secondarily to ask whether they discuss information gained from the Internet with physicians.
Education Based Publications

Advances in mixed methods research

Bergman, M. M (2008)

London: Sage

Advances in Mixed Methods Research provides an essential introduction to the fast-growing field of mixed methods research. Bergman's book examines the current state of mixed-methods research, exploring exciting new ways of conceptualizing and conducting empirical research in the social and health sciences. Illuminating new ways of conceptualizing and conducting empirical research in the social sciences and humanities, this book contains contributions from some of the world's leading experts on qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. The contributions cover all of the main practical and methodological issues and represent a number of different visions of what mixed methods research is and where it is going. Contributions from the world's leading experts in qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches are brought together, clearing the way for a more constructive approach to social research. These contributions cover the main practical and methodological issues and include a number of different visions of what mixed methods research is. The discussion also covers the use of mixed methods in a diverse range of fields, including sociology, education, politics, psychology, computational science and methodology. This book represents an important contribution to the ongoing debate surrounding the use of mixed methods in the social sciences and health research, and presents a convincing argument that the conventional, paradigmatic view of qualitative and quantitative research is outdated and in need of replacement. It will be essential reading for anyone actively engaged in qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods research and for students of social research methods. Manfred Max Bergman is Chair of Methodology and Political Sociology at the University of Basel. Very good text wherein the mixed methods approach is coherently developed and its current (and potential) applications are described in clear, useful and interesting ways. I particularly liked the depth of understanding with Bergman demonstrating subtle implications of the advances. For the undergraduate level, I felt this was perhaps too advanced but well worth a read if the mixed methods approach is adopted. Mr Paul Buckley Nursing , Bradford University
Education Based Publications

Research Design Issues for Mixed Method and Mixed Model Studies

Tashakkori, Abbas & Teddlie, Charles (1998)

A. Tashakkori & C. Teddlie, Mixed Methodology: Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches, pp. 40-58. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications

Discusses the concept of triangulation from various perspectives and the variety of approaches to implementing mixed methods research. Builds on Patton’s (1990) discussion of ‘mixed form’ design to a broader model in order to develop a taxonomy for distinguishing various mixed method designs and approaches.
Sociology Based Publications

Why Ethnography Should be the Most Important Method in the Study of Human Development

Weisner, Thomas S. (1996)

Chicago: University of Chicago Press, In Jessor, R., Colby, A., and Shweder, R., (Eds.). Ethnography and human development. Context and meaning in social inquiry, pp. 305-324

The recognition of the cultural place as a powerfully important influence in development immediately suggests that there is no "one" important thing, and that development is multiply determined in cultural context. All of the influences which usually come to mind are important in every cultural place. DeVelopmentally sensitive and appropriate interac¬tions are indeed crucial, ,for example, but the existence of those dyadic interactions is due to 'the 'everyday cultural routine of life and to shared understandings which surround and scaffold them. Self-understanding and esteem are important as well, but culturally provided settings and their meanings make these possible. Attachment and trust are important, but how do infants and Children experience strangers and learn whom to trust? Ethnography brings the importance of the cultural place to the center of attention, transforming it from ground to figure. An important goal of ethnographic research is to describe and understand the cultural place and its influence on the everyday lives of its members. Whatever one's opinions are about epistemological and methodological concerns regarding ethnographically derived knowledge (and there surely are such concerns, as for all methods), the remarkable findings from ethnographic work re¬garding the varying cultural tools children use to develop in cultural places throughout the world alone provide sufficient reason for ethnography's deep incorporation into developmental work. The chapters in this section offer interesting findings and their own models for how to integrate ethnography into developmental research. My comments on the chapters take advantage of their work to develop some general points about fieldwork and ethnography. First and foremost, eth¬nography and fieldwork get the researcher out into the cultural place of children and families. Once there, many ways of doing ethnography are possible and are illustrated in these chapters. Second, "methodocentrism,” the exclusive use of one method and fear of others, should be resisted as illustrated by these chapters. It is not plausible that any important question in developmental studies can be answered with a single method. Ethnography can and should be complementary with other methods. I suggest a way to talk about research methods different than the iconic qualitative/quantitative contrast, which seems to encourage polarizing discourse and is in any case not very useful or accurate. Third, ethnography is not limited only to early exploratory stages of research and to description of local meanings. It can and should be question driven; it provides valid evidence to test against our models of the world; and it produces findings, as these chapters demonstrate. Next, I suggest that ethnography is to the developmental sciences as siblings or cousins are to one another—a part of the same broad lineage in the naturalistic traditions of the social sciences. John Modell imagines ethnography and development as two fascinated and mutually dangerous lovers. Both metaphors are probably appropriate at times. Finally, I suggest that a number of salutary things would happier if fieldwork in another cultural place, like learning statistics, was a normal, expected part of every developmentalist's qualitative and mixed methods research training.
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